A sustainable green revolution for Africa

13 November 2021
video

The Issues with India’s Green Revolution

Since the Green Revolution, India’s crop productivity has significantly improved, making the country one of the world’s largest grain and rice exporters. However, questions remain as to the success of the revolution in terms of food security, welfare, and quality of life. Despite large increases in production volume, overall food availability has barely increased due to the population almost tripling since the 1960’s. Per capita net availability jumped from 144 kg per year in 1951 to 171 kg in 1971 largely due to greater availability of wheat, but over the last 50 years has fluctuated between 170 and 180 kg.

Increases in yields have not resulted in corresponding decreases in malnutrition, with one quarter of all those malnourished in the world living in India. The country ranks 94th of 107 countries in the 2020 Global Hunger Index and roughly 14% of the population is undernourished. India is also experiencing rapid increases in cases of over-nutrition, due to an excess in the consumption of calories and lack of variety in their diets. Today, agricultural households account for many of the extreme poverty cases in India, with many farmers also encountering crippling debt and severe mental health issues. In recent months changing government policies in India have sparked outrage from farmers with huge farmer protests taking place. Alongside these problems, the green revolution has exacerbated many of the negative environmental impacts of agriculture in the region, including:

 

  • Loss of soil fertility
  • Soil erosion
  • Soil toxicity
  • Diminishing water resources
  • Pollution of underground water
  • Salinity of underground water
  • Increased incidences of human and livestock diseases
  • Climate change

Read the full insight here: 

A sustainable green revolution for Africa

13 November 2021

The Issues with India’s Green Revolution

Since the Green Revolution, India’s crop productivity has significantly improved, making the country one of the world’s largest grain and rice exporters. However, questions remain as to the success of the revolution in terms of food security, welfare, and quality of life. Despite large increases in production volume, overall food availability has barely increased due to the population almost tripling since the 1960’s. Per capita net availability jumped from 144 kg per year in 1951 to 171 kg in 1971 largely due to greater availability of wheat, but over the last 50 years has fluctuated between 170 and 180 kg.

Increases in yields have not resulted in corresponding decreases in malnutrition, with one quarter of all those malnourished in the world living in India. The country ranks 94th of 107 countries in the 2020 Global Hunger Index and roughly 14% of the population is undernourished. India is also experiencing rapid increases in cases of over-nutrition, due to an excess in the consumption of calories and lack of variety in their diets. Today, agricultural households account for many of the extreme poverty cases in India, with many farmers also encountering crippling debt and severe mental health issues. In recent months changing government policies in India have sparked outrage from farmers with huge farmer protests taking place. Alongside these problems, the green revolution has exacerbated many of the negative environmental impacts of agriculture in the region, including:

 

  • Loss of soil fertility
  • Soil erosion
  • Soil toxicity
  • Diminishing water resources
  • Pollution of underground water
  • Salinity of underground water
  • Increased incidences of human and livestock diseases
  • Climate change

Read the full insight here: 

Stephen Awuah's featured publications

See All Posts

Sustainability & ESG

A sustainable green revolution for Africa

Rather than copying India’s Green Revolution, African countries should learn from those mistakes, look to raise productivity levels without harming natural resources. 

Insight

Agribusiness

Farrelly & Michell’s Stephen Awuah on the prospects for food & agribusiness in Africa

Farrelly & Mitchell Africa's Stephen Awuah speaks about the company’s consultancy work in west and sub-Saharan Africa.

Video

Sustainability & ESG

The importance of building sustainability & ESG into your food or agribusiness

Our food sustainability consultants are present in Africa, Europe, and the Middle East part of our extended team of 300 experts worldwide. 

Video
See All Posts

Insightful blogs on topical agri-food themes

Get in touch with us or find an office closest to you.
Register now