Sugar Rush or Sugar Push

05 April 2017
video

Consumer Attitudes

The sugar phenomenon has been linked to contradictory consumer attitudes towards its reduction in confectionery and other foods. While global health trends pushed many food companies towards reducing or eliminating sugar from their products, consumers are not keen on artificial sweeteners replacing sugar, as it contradicts the ‘natural ingredients’ trend and considerably alters the flavour profile. Nevertheless, many food companies have been pushed towards dealing with the sugar content in their products due to consumer demand and changing regulations worldwide. This is evidenced by the FDA’s new nutrition facts panel in the US demanding larger and bolder calorie declarations on packaging. Meanwhile in the UK there is an ongoing sugar tax debate.

When it comes to sweeteners, the biggest hurdle has been the fact that the majority of consumers do not enjoy the taste of sweeteners and do not want to compromise flavour for health benefits. Moreover, the numbers that tolerate no-sugar or low-sugar products varies drastically from market to market. For example, 44% of soft drink sales in the UK have no sugar and no calories, compared to 1% in Lithuania and 7% in Italy according to UNESDA which represents approximately 75% of European soft drink manufacturers. According to Sula, a German sweets manufacturer with a market presence across Europe, Germany’s sugar-free sweets market accounts for 30% compared to the UK where approximately 5% of manufacturers replace sugar with sweeteners.

This is especially true for more indulgent products such as chocolate, as consumers prefer sugar replaced by premium ingredients rather than sweeteners.

Click here to download the full insight. 

Sugar Rush or Sugar Push

05 April 2017

Consumer Attitudes

The sugar phenomenon has been linked to contradictory consumer attitudes towards its reduction in confectionery and other foods. While global health trends pushed many food companies towards reducing or eliminating sugar from their products, consumers are not keen on artificial sweeteners replacing sugar, as it contradicts the ‘natural ingredients’ trend and considerably alters the flavour profile. Nevertheless, many food companies have been pushed towards dealing with the sugar content in their products due to consumer demand and changing regulations worldwide. This is evidenced by the FDA’s new nutrition facts panel in the US demanding larger and bolder calorie declarations on packaging. Meanwhile in the UK there is an ongoing sugar tax debate.

When it comes to sweeteners, the biggest hurdle has been the fact that the majority of consumers do not enjoy the taste of sweeteners and do not want to compromise flavour for health benefits. Moreover, the numbers that tolerate no-sugar or low-sugar products varies drastically from market to market. For example, 44% of soft drink sales in the UK have no sugar and no calories, compared to 1% in Lithuania and 7% in Italy according to UNESDA which represents approximately 75% of European soft drink manufacturers. According to Sula, a German sweets manufacturer with a market presence across Europe, Germany’s sugar-free sweets market accounts for 30% compared to the UK where approximately 5% of manufacturers replace sugar with sweeteners.

This is especially true for more indulgent products such as chocolate, as consumers prefer sugar replaced by premium ingredients rather than sweeteners.

Click here to download the full insight. 

Malachy Mitchell's featured publications

See All Posts

Food safety & security

Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) and food security

How can the impact of foreign investment be optimised to maximise benefits in terms of food security, while at the same time minimising risks to all stakeholders? 

Insight

Agribusiness

Coffee producers place faith in regenerative agriculture

Regenerative agriculture is seen as a genuine solution as coffee producers battle to protect their crops. But what makes regenerative agriculture so compelling a prospect?

Blog

Food safety & security

Health of children at the heart of UN food safety summit

The UN Food Safety Summit will assess why the food system continues to cause poor diet, malnutrition, undernutrition, obesity and child mortality prevails.

Blog
See All Posts

Join our latest webinar on climate change and food safety.

Get in touch with us or find an office closest to you.
Register now